Customising Zend_Form Views

Sometimes, you’ll want the same form in more than one place in your application, however occasionally, that means your forms look terrible! However you can specify a different view script to use (I put mine in a forms subdirectory):

$this->addDecorators(array(
    array('ViewScript', array('viewScript' => 'view_folder/different-looking-form.phtml'))
));

And the bit that confdused me for a while, accessing the form in that view is strangle called $this->element:

<?= $this->element; ?>

Of course, as you may know, you don’t have to render the form like that, which is kind of the point of this:

<?php
$form = $this->element;
$supply = $form->getSupply();
$fueltype = $form->getFueltype();

?>

<form id = "<?=$form->getAttrib('id') ?>"
    name = "<?=$form->getName() ?>"
    method = "<?=$form->getMethod(); ?>"
    enctype = "<?=$form->getEnctype(); ?>"
    >
    <dl class="zend_form">

        <dt><label>Supply / Meter</label></dt>
        <dd><?=$supply->getMeterNumber() ?></dd>

        <dt><label>Fuel Type</label></dt>
        <dd><?=$fueltype->getFueltype() ?></dd>

        <dt><label>Description</label></dt>
        <dd><?=$supply->getDescription() ?></dd>

    <?php
    foreach ($form->getElements() as $element)
    {
        echo $element;
    }
    ?>
    </dl>
</form>

Sorted! No need to encase your form in more divs and mess around with CSS! 🙂

Auto Sorting Zend_Db_Table_Rowsets with Pagination

Expanding upon my abstract DB class that auto creates Zend_Paginators on demand, I thought it was about time I did something regarding automatically sorting the records returned.

First thing I did was go in and edit my db base class (need a reminder? https://delboy1978uk.wordpress.com/2014/06/30/auto-paginator-with-zend_db_table/), adding a sort_field property, a setSortField() method, and a little if statement in our getResult() method :

    /** @var string $sort_field */
    protected $sort_field = null;
    /**
     *  For instance 'date_added DESC'
     *  @param int $no
     *  @return $this
     */
    public function setSortField($sort_and_direction)
    {
        $this->sort_field = $sort_and_direction;
        return $this;
    }
    /**
     * @param Zend_Db_Select|string $select
     * @return \Zend_Db_Table_Rowset_Abstract|Paginator
     */
    public function getResult($select)
    {
        if(is_string($select))
        {
            $select = $this->select()->where($select);
        }
        if($this->sort_field)
        {
            $select->order($this->sort_field);
        }
        if($this->paginator_flag == true)
        {
            return $this->getPaginator($select);
        }
        return $this->fetchAll($select);
    }

Now we have that, we can sort any queries like so:

        // Get the page number
        $page = ($this->getRequest()->getParam('page')) ?: 1;
                
        // Set pagination
        $db->setPaginatorFlag(true);
        $db->setNumPerPage(30);
        $db->setPage($page);
        
        // Get sort field
        $sort = $this->getRequest()->getParam('sort');
        $dir = $this->getRequest()->getParam('dir');
        
        // Set the sort
        $db->setSortField($sort.' '.$dir);

Again, in your DB class method, make sure it calls $this->getResult(); and not fetchAll().

Anyway, thats only one half of the equation, what we need is sort links! I create a view helper for this, which basically calls the url view helper, but with additional search capabilities. In the Bootstrap (as you’ll know), we define our routes as such:

$router->addRoute(
    'lead-assessor-view-supply',
    new Zend_Controller_Router_Route(
        '/lead-assessor/view-supply/:orgid/:id/:page/:sort/:dir',
         array(
            'controller' => 'lead-assessor',
            'action' => 'view-supply', 
            'page' => 1, 
            'sort' => 'date_from', 
            'dir' => 'DESC'
         )
      )
);

As you can see, I have added sort and dir in addition to page.  To get the links working, send the page, sort, and dir variables to the view, and in the view, instead of calling $this->url(blahblah); we will call our own view helper, sortLinks(); Here’s the class:

<?php 

class ESOS_View_Helper_SortLinks extends Zend_View_Helper_Abstract
{
    /** 
     *  Pass in a route name, and an array of any params which are the same for all the sort links
     *  @param string $route_name
     *  @param array $params
     *  @param string $field_name
     *  @param string $sort_field
     *  @param string $sort_dir
     *  @param string $field_label
     *  @param string $classes
     *  @return string
     */
    public function sortLinks(array $params,$route_name,$field_name,$field_label, $classes = null)
    {
        // Set the current sort field
        $current_sort_field = isset($params['sort']) ? $params['sort'] : 'ASC' ;
        
        // Set the Icon
        $icon = $this->view->sortIcon($field_name,$current_sort_field,$params['dir']);
        
        // Set params
        $params['sort'] = $field_name;
        $params['dir'] = $this->view->sortDir($field_name, $current_sort_field, $params['dir']);
        
        // Build the HTML
        $link = '<a href="';
        $link .= $this->view->url($params,$route_name);
        $link .= '" class="';
        $link .= $classes;
        $link .= '">';
        $link .= $icon;
        $link .= $field_label;
        $link .= '</a>';
        
        // Return the HTML
        return $link;
    }
}

Almost there! You’ll see it is calling another two view helpers, sortIcon and sortDir:

<?php

class ESOS_View_Helper_SortDir extends Zend_View_Helper_Abstract
{
    public function sortDir($field_name, $current_sort_field, $dir)
    {
        if($field_name == $current_sort_field)
        {
            switch($dir)
            {
                case 'ASC':
                    $dir = 'DESC';
                    break;
                case 'DESC':
                default:
                    $dir = 'ASC';
                    break;
            }
        }
        return $dir;
    }
}
<?php

class ESOS_View_Helper_SortIcon extends Zend_View_Helper_Abstract
{
    public function sortIcon($field_name, $current_sort_field, $dir)
    {
        if($field_name == $current_sort_field)
        {
            switch($dir)
            {
                case 'ASC':
                    $icon = '<i class="fa fa-caret-up"></i>&nbsp;';
                    break;
                case 'DESC':
                default:
                    $icon = '<i class="fa fa-caret-up"></i>&nbsp;';
                    break;
            }
        }
        else 
        {
            $icon = null;
        }
        return $icon;
    }
}

These just figure out which direction of sort the link will generate. The Icons are from Font Awesome, but feel free to use anything you like!

Tying it all together, in your view, define an array of any parameters that you will pass into each sort link (sort, and dir should always be in there, page if using the paginator):

    // Common params for the sortLinks
    $params = array(
        'orgid' => $this->org->getId(),
        'page' => $this->page,
        'sort' => $this->sort,
        'dir' => $this->dir,
    );

At the top of your table where you want your clickable sort links, call:

<?= $this->sortLinks($params,'portfolio-admin-users','name',$this->t('Organisation')); ?>

Sorting By Price

Sorting By Status

This will save a LOT of farting around in the future! Have fun! 🙂

Installing a ZendFramework App on IIS

Yes yes I know. Please. I’m just doing my job.

Anyway, hatred of MS and their less than satisfactory web based products aside, heres how to set up a Zend Framework App on IIS. I am assuming IIS is already up and running and that PHP is installed (only because thats where I started from)

Open IIS, in the computer click on Web Sites.
In the action menu click new website.
Put in a description, hit next.
Stick the servers IP in, port, and domain, hit next
Browse to sites home path hit next
Assign permissions (I had to browse to folder, right click and un-read-only my session, uploads, and logs folders), hit next, and finish.

Ok. Now IIS uses some thing thats similar to .htaccess, only it isn’t. Its called IIRF, and it needs setting up if it isn’t already. You can get it here: Download the Ionic’s ISAP Rewrite Filter (IIRF) here

Create Iirf.ini and shove this in it: (this took hours of farting around to get working :-s )

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -s [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -l [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d

RewriteRule ^/(.*(\.js|\.swf)(\?.+))$ - [L,I]
RewriteRule ^/(.*(\.js|\.ico|\.gif|\.jpg|\.png|\.css|\.html|\.htm|\.swf|\.flv))$ /$1 [L,I]
RewriteRule ^/(.*)$ /index.php/$1 [L,I]

Put this in your Zend Apps public folder. Note that the commented out rule is for ignoring css js and image files etc in your public folder so as not to get rewritten. However it messes with your GET parameters when you have a filename in the query.(IF anyone knows how to write a rule that say continue to route it if those extensions come after a question mark then PLEASE let me know!)

Restart IIS, and that should be you!

NB. Neither delboy1978uk nor anyone else endorses the use of IIS for any serious web development.

NB. I have found normal clean urls work but ?query=param gets dont! i will update once i fix this!